SUBMIT YOUR PODCAST QUESTIONS IN THE COMMENT SECTION BELOW

One of the most powerful features of the Hurlbut Academy is its interactivity.  You are connected directly to Shane Hurlbut, ASC, AMPAS.  He is here to answer your questions in podcasts that you can find throughout the site for FREE.  It is his commitment and our commitment at the Academy to invest in your future, to guide, mentor and inspire you to shoot for the stars with the foundation of this conservatory style learning that will JET SET you ahead of the Pack.

Please submit your questions in the comments section and if a question is TIME SENSITIVE please mark it as such.  This happens a lot where members have shoots coming up and are looking for questions answered in a timely manner to help them.  We will do our best to filter through these requests which will be subject to Shane’s shooting schedule.

We are directing all comments and questions to our New Forum, please find the related course in the forum’s categories to submit.

davidyouso 20 days ago

Hey Shane, I’m looking to purchase my first nice piece of glass. If you only had enough funds for one lens under 10k, which would it be?

JustusPage 25 days ago

Hey Shane! I have a question about lighting blue screen. I promise I’m gonna go through the course on it soon, but in the meantime my question is this: What is the ideal exposure of the blue screen in relation to the subject? is the goal to have the screen a stop over middle gray? Or equal to the exposure of the subject’s face? I want to make sure I don’t over or underexpose the blue screen as I plan out this day on the sound!stage. Any info is greatly appreciated! Thanks for all you do!

clinthowardfilm 25 days ago

Hi Shane and Lida, I just want to first of all say, your work here has elevated my skills but more so my mindset on how to tell stories. I am able to provide more value to the sets I work on, and do more with less. Thank you for providing the tools to elevate my game and giving me shoulders to stand on. So, I work with a lot of different cameras and a lot of rental cameras. Everything from Arri to Red, Blackmagic, Panasonic, etc. I have noticed how many cameras preform differently even within the same brand and model. I now spend a lot more time in camera prep looking at exposure and color to find the sweet spot. This seems to be more necessary than ever with high functioning cheep cameras like the BM 4.6k. I feel like one of the sacrifices with cheep cinema cameras is quality control. I use a Flanders 2340 monitor in tandem with a black-magic 5″ monitor. When prepping, I get different IRE readings between the camera, my Flanders and my BM monitor. My question is, when prepping cameras, especially cheeper ones, what do you use to find the correct IRE values? Is there a specific exposure chart you use? Do you or your 1st AC have process to check the IRE values? And should I trust my Flanders false color or the in Camera false color? Lastly, bringing in my Spectra light meter, It seems to me that it reads a bit hot for Digital and I have to bring my ISO down. I learned false color before learning the light meter so I don’t know the best practices for knowing how I need to compensate for digital sensors. It feels like i’m guessing here and would love to find a process to know 100% any discrepancies between camera and all monitors. Thanks for the great advice. Clint Howard II P.S.Also I got the Flanders biased on your advice and it’s made me a better DP like no other tool has! Cheers!

clinthowardfilm 25 days ago

Hi Shane and Lida,

masonthoward 26 days ago

Hello,

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    • masonthoward    26 days ago

      @masonthoward Do you have any ideas on building a practical production studio space, perhaps used for shooting tests, interviews, or other small-scale productions? How much space is manageable? What would your checklist cover? What are the essentials from your perspective? Electrical considerations? Lighting grid? Equipment storage? Even floor type, color of space, etc. Welcome big and small ideas! Thank you greatly for all of your incredible insight!

AdamS 12 days ago

Hi Shane, when you’re creating the look for a new project, what comes first- the lens or the LUT? When you’re trying different lenses, are you making your choice based on the flat log image, Rec709 or a custom LUT? Thanks Shane! -Adam (Manchester, England)

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    • Shane Hurlbut, ASC    7 days ago

      @AdamS Hi Adam, Lenses come first with just a REC 709 base LUT, this is how I start every project with the glass, it is the soul of the project. I have some great lessons inside the Academy that go into the theory of all this. This is Part 1 of a 3 part series. https://www.hurlbutacademy.com/courses/visual-landscape/lessons/composition/topic/how-lenses-assist-storytelling-i/ The LUT comes when you want to hone and finesse your vision and look.

BennyMigs 11 days ago

Hi Shane. I have ben a full time still photographer for 16 years and started dipping my feet in to filmmaking when the SLR revolution happened. I do mostly B2B social media branding videos but I have always had a love for music and wanted to make music videos. I have 4 of them under my belt now and my 5th this week. The first 3 I shot, produced, edited and wrote myself. I quickly learned that a small crew is the way to go. The last one I teamed up with an Academy member as a DP and I directed it. So I know we talk about feature films a-lot and I think thats great. But I know you got your start on music videos and was wondering if you had any tips to get on set of a music video with a real budget. I would take any job role. I love the Keith Urban series you have and would love if you did more music video lessons. I am in NY also if that helps at all? Thanks again for the help.