How To Replicate Early Morning Interior Light: Into The Badlands

INCLUDED IN THIS LESSON:  16 Minutes of Instructional Video, In-Depth Written Breakdown, Behind-the-Scene Stills, and Equipment Breakdown List and Top Down Lighting Schematics-SUPPLIED W/ENGLISH SUBTITLES 

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL LEARN:  As a cinematographer, you are asked to do many things. One of them will be to make two different locations feel like the same one. This requires consistent lighting in a controlled environment. For this sequence, Shane had to keep an early morning look consistent throughout a four day shoot for a fight sequence.

In this lesson Shane Hurlbut, ASC will guide you through how he creates that early morning light look and what differentiates it from a similar twilight feel. You will learn how to balance your image for the early morning look by setting your shadows at just the right level, introducing different tonality into your image, and lighting with layers. Finally, Shane will take you through his diffusion of hard light for a beautiful closeup on a face.

  • How to create an early morning look
  • How to plan your interior work around the path of the sun and what to look for
  • How to match lighting between two separate locations
  • How to light in layers
  • How to introduce various tones into your image
  • How to control sunlight to keep your lighting consistent
  • How to use tents to keep lighting consistent
  • How to soften your hard light for a beautiful closeup
  • How to light for overhead coverage

REVIEWS:

<<<Elisha R>>> Outstanding. I love this. This is what I like about the Inner Circle. This is my definition of behind the scenes rather than the actor and directors accolades they give each other on the EXTRA sections on the Bluray/DVD products of the major movies.(forgive me for being cynical.) lol Thanks again Shane on inspiring future cinematographers/photographers.
<<<Kurt L>>> Great stuff. A lot of great practical ideas. Thank you!
<<<Jacopo R>>> Another awesome and generous lesson, thanks Shane!
<<<Matt W>>> Thanks for the awesome lesson. It’s super beneficial to be able to get this type of experience.
<<<Elisha R>>> Outstanding. I love this. This is what I like about the Hurlbut Academy. This is my definition of behind the scenes rather than the actor and directors accolades they give each other on the EXTRA sections on the Bluray/DVD products of the major movies.(forgive me for being cynical.) lol Thanks again Shane on inspiring future cinematographers/photographers.
<<<Alex L>>> Thank you! for another great lighting Lesson. The scene looks amazing
<<<Paul V>>> I love this. This is so amazing. So many good pointers here. I always wondered about the technique of going from a wide with an 18K to a CU and what to do with the light (bring in another light and soften it or just soften the 18K). I’ve never used an 18K. It’s great that you went over that info here. I have this obsession with lighting day interiors because I love streaks of light. LOL  You rock, Shane! This is incredible!

Bill Stone 26 days ago

Great lesson. The quick medium shot of the redhead as she slides along the floor ready to fight Quinn @ 12:10 – I love the cold-ish clean tone on her face. Is this the same Joker 800 + pancake you used on the similarly lovely Med CU of Lydia in the previous lesson [@01:15]? Keeping it even on the faces as actors move is a big concern. Thanks a lot.

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    • Shane Hurlbut, ASC    25 days ago

      @Bill Stone Hi Bill, no this was a motivated Sky Light that you do not see, but I felt it worked well in that space as it had a atrium feel, so I added a 5' wide by 10' long skylight that was T-8 flo's daylight balanced. Yes I wanted the source large enough so that it gave them room to move around. One very talented ASC DP told me, you never light a mark, but you light an area so the actors can move and feel free.

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David Verwey 29 days ago

Hi Shane, did you gel you 18Ks to get the cyan cooler tones or did you add that in your LUT/ Color Correction Bay. Finally the green reflection on the wall, was that the grass outside reflection or did you a have a bounce with green reflecting into it?

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    • Shane Hurlbut, ASC    28 days ago

      @David Verwey HI David, No CTB added to the 18K's, I set my color temp on my camera around 4800K which then takes the HMI 18K source and cools it down. That green reflection was the sun pounding the grass and creating that.

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paulacciardi.film 24 days ago

Hello, Just curious what “waterfalled diffusion” is? Thank you.

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    • Shane Hurlbut, ASC    23 days ago

      @paulacciardi.film Water falling diffusion is where you take the roll of whatever diffusion you are using and put it on a c-stand and roll it out like a waterfall. So it becomes a rectangle source vertically.

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pauloleitejr 30 days ago

Hi, the comment section wasnt loading, sorry for sending an email. My question is about the final part of the scene in which we can see the outside of the location. How was that achieved? I´m asking beacause in the first part the outside was all “flagged” by math bounces and blown out. So what was it? Green screnn? Big Plotter image? Or just right time of the day to shoot the wide shots? Thanks a lot for all the great work! Greetings from the south!

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    • Shane Hurlbut, ASC    29 days ago

      @pauloleitejr Hi Pauloleitejr, the exterior was right time of day, we shot the wide shots on another day so my rigging team could get in there and tent the whole place and have it ready. Then the next shoot day we came back at the perfect time to shoot the wides AND ALL THAT GACK IS OUT OF THERE. HA HA

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