Action Sequence Cinematography– How to Blend Camera Styles: Part 2

INCLUDED IN THIS LESSON:  14 minutes of video instruction, Script Analysis, and Schematics    –Supplied w/English Subtitles

IN THIS LESSON YOU WILL LEARN:  This lesson is Part 2 of a 4 part series in understanding what it takes to shoot an action sequence.  From pre production discussions, preparing floor plans and schematics to communicate your vision.  One of our hardest jobs as an artist is to communicate what is in our heads.  This lesson gives you the step by step process to do this, as well as using specific types of camera motion to educate and immerse your audience.

  • Understanding your scene:
    • It’s important to understand your scene because you need to know: A) the emotion of the scene B) the purpose of the scene, and C) how dynamic the scene is.
    • Once you gather your thoughts and have your initial conception of the scene, you need to figure out how it can be covered and what the camera movement might be.
    • The camera movement is going to make or break your story and how the audience feels following it.
  • Creating unique perspectives:
    • On “Waist Deep,” we decided to obstruct or have objects in the foreground. We never wanted clean images of O2 and him running after his car.
    • Creating layered images will help create these unique perspectives.
    • In high speed situations, this made our images more kinetic and helped illustrate the tension of the scene.
  • Using movement helps create a sense of haste:
    • For O2, everything is on the line to get his son back. This is where you need to show the audience he is willing to do whatever it takes.
    • Using quick movements to track your character can give you that effect.
    • On “Waist Deep,” we used electric grip rigging carts to maintain the necessary speed and to blast past cars and objects in the foreground.

REVIEWS:

<<<Hafez>>>Amazing!
<<<Steven>>>Amazing insight here…
<<<Zhibo>>>Very informative!
<<<Pavel>>>Amazing Shane!
<<<Oliver>>>Super cool!
<<<James>>>A truly masterful sequence of shots here Shane.
<<<Peter>>>Great lesson, thanks for the insight!