Menu Account

MIXING THE ART AND SCIENCE OF CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • October 22, 2018
  • Shane Hurlbut, ASC
MIXING THE ART AND SCIENCE OF CINEMATOGRAPHY
This month, the Inner Circle podcast covers your questions on: How to light for complete darkness Blending camera formats seamlessly Deconstructing a script for camera emotion How to create camera emotions to match your MUSE keywords using depth of field, camera angles, lighting and more.

This month, the Inner Circle podcast covers your questions on:
How to light for complete darkness
Blending camera formats seamlessly
Deconstructing a script for camera emotion
How to create camera emotions to match your MUSE keywords using depth of field, camera angles, lighting and more.
Play it here:

Or Listen to it on iTunes HERE:
<a href=”https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/shanes-inner-circle/id1382924546?mt=2″>SIC Podcast EP 14</a>
Thank you to everyone who submitted questions for this month’s Inner Circle podcast. Just a reminder that you can submit more questions here-
Submit your questions for Shane and Lydia
Podcast Questions:
0:39:26
Shane You recently posted an Instagram photo of Myles pushing the Flo cart. I’m not sure of the intended purpose of the Flo cart but if there was an intended purpose of the Flo cart could you give us some details? While you were in production on “Into the Badlands” you posted another Instagram photo of another fluorescent light the Luma Panel which look like a versatile light. Could you talk about the Luma Panel and why it was the light of choice on a soundstage? Thanks Phil
9:35:23
Hey Shane. Thanks for all the amazing content in the inner circle and for forging this awesome community! I have a question about exposure. When moving from daylight exterior to an interior, do you try to maintain the same light intensity inside? Or do you change exposures in the middle of the shot? It may sound nuts, but are there any key situations you would say to attempt an exposure change, or just try to maintain the same exposure throughout and blow lights through an interior? I know it’s a packed question. Thanks for your time and all your investment in us! Jacob Hamil
14:07:06
Thanks so much for creating this community based on your huge wealth of information. I’ve been thinking about this idea for some time and I’m sure others have been too. The most valuable learning tool for aspiring DPs is probably getting the opportunity to be on set with a seasoned DP! Many of us don’t have that opportunity. Which is exactly why your ‘Inner Circle’ is wonderful and relevant! This comment isn’t necessarily targeted at you, but to all DPs (and the studios that pay them). My proposal for certain films: Dedicate someone on set everyday who’s job it is to diagram every lighting/camera setup for each scene and possibly take BTS photos. Make those scene diagrams and brief write-ups of each scene available for a price (the same way that you can buy a published version of a script) online. I feel like this could be an extremely valuable tool for aspiring cinematographers. There have been so many times where I see a beautifully lit scene and wish I knew the lighting schematics. Roger Deakins shares knowledge on his forum but it isn’t very specific. Shane, you share very specific information and lighting diagrams which is fabulous. I’m not saying every movie should have this kind of attention. But for certain films, it would be fantastic. Do you think this kind of request could ever happen / make it through the studio $$$ pipeline of legality? Of course this is based on the assumption that cinematographers (and studios) would be willing to share their ‘secrets’ and lighting setups… Just interested in your thoughts!
19:50:10
Shane and Lydia thank you so much for this incredible resource, your whole team rocks! I have a lighting question that I struggled with and that drove me crazy on a recent production. The director wanted complete darkness, this was a horror film with some paranormal activity taking place, so there was no moonlight and for the most part there were no candles. How would you light for complete or nearly complete darkness but still actually be able to see something of an image? Or is this a crazy thing to try? Thanks, Ryan
24:59:06
Dear Mr Shane First of all I want thank you for sharing knowledge with us . I have a question to you . How do you shoot some movies with different cameras varies in their quality and the audience doesn’t notice that ? Regards Ahmed
31:14:05
Hey Shane, I was curious if you could speak on your process for evaluating a frame whether it’s a camera test/lens test whatever. How do you train yourself to notice subtly nuisances in a frame that help when evaluating things like how the frame rolls off into the highlights, evaluating color/contrast/sharpness when working with different lenses (I find that when I try to do things like that my eye just fails me because more often then don’t it feels like I’m searching for some elusive quality that I can’t even discern.) I want to be able to learn or train myself how to evaluate these subtle details that add up to making a great image.
36:13:10
Hi Shane, I am a weekend warrior filmmaker and have a reasonable grip on the shooting side but am trying to understand the construction of the average 100 minute film. I have dissected a movie, how many scenes, how many shots etc but would appreciate your thoughts on this. e.g is there a loose formula or do you just have a script and shoot what’s required? and let that dictate the length of the movie… Thanks Rod Hardinge, Australia
39:20:05
Hi Shane, thanks for this incredible community and source of information you’ve created. As an actor who is also a filmmaker and has a photography business in NYC, I think I may approach things a little different. I want to ask you about your approach when planning your shots. In your last podcast you mentioned ‘editing in camera’ with the Digital Bolex when you were in school, but when I went to Vincent Laforet’s Directing Motion Tour he recommended getting all the coverage in a more “classic” approach going from a Wide to a Medium, to MCU, CU… He warned about the dangers of not covering your ass. I’ve tried the “classic” approach in the past and on a recent project, but honestly it bores me to death. Personally, I love editing in camera. It’s thrilling to me and It saves me a lot of time in the set and editing room. It also makes me really invest in my coverage and my shots and I love it all coming together in the editing room like I envisioned it on the shoot. Rarely I miss not having shot something and for me, the time savings and my energy in the set make this occasional loss worth it. What is your take on this matter? Do you have a different approach with personal projects vs professional projects? Any Thanks again and I look forward to seeing you again soon. Ricardo Birnbaum.
45:17:03
Hi Shane I am Daniel from Nigeria i do appreciate all you have being doing and still plan to do in the bid to help us the next generation highly appreciate the commitment you put into it. i have a question , what is an emotional breakdown made up of and how do you do that for a script would appreciate if you can share example, insights so i know how to make one in respect to a story. And would like to also know what informs your decisions and choices as you make a breakdown.
49:57:14
Hello my SIC family I just completed MUSE and have developed my keywords that represents what my story says. They are COMPASSION, SELFLESS, UNDERDEVELOPED, LEAD, ENDURANCE. How can these words be portrayed in my Camera emotions, Lens choice, Camera angle, Key to fill lighting ratio, Color pallet, Depth of field. I’d really appreciate all your input and Shane Hurlbut ASC too. Please guys help. Niel Ehimen

Play it here:

Or Listen to it on iTunes HERE: SIC Podcast EP 14

Thank you to everyone who submitted questions for this month’s Inner Circle podcast. Just a reminder that you can submit more questions here-
Submit your questions for Shane and Lydia

Podcast Questions:

0:39:26

Shane You recently posted an Instagram photo of Myles pushing the Flo cart. I’m not sure of the intended purpose of the Flo cart but if there was an intended purpose of the Flo cart could you give us some details? While you were in production on “Into the Badlands” you posted another Instagram photo of another fluorescent light the Luma Panel which look like a versatile light. Could you talk about the Luma Panel and why it was the light of choice on a soundstage? Thanks Phil

9:35:23

Hey Shane. Thanks for all the amazing content in the inner circle and for forging this awesome community! I have a question about exposure. When moving from daylight exterior to an interior, do you try to maintain the same light intensity inside? Or do you change exposures in the middle of the shot? It may sound nuts, but are there any key situations you would say to attempt an exposure change, or just try to maintain the same exposure throughout and blow lights through an interior? I know it’s a packed question. Thanks for your time and all your investment in us! Jacob Hamil

14:07:06

Thanks so much for creating this community based on your huge wealth of information. I’ve been thinking about this idea for some time and I’m sure others have been too. The most valuable learning tool for aspiring DPs is probably getting the opportunity to be on set with a seasoned DP! Many of us don’t have that opportunity. Which is exactly why your ‘Inner Circle’ is wonderful and relevant! This comment isn’t necessarily targeted at you, but to all DPs (and the studios that pay them). My proposal for certain films: Dedicate someone on set everyday who’s job it is to diagram every lighting/camera setup for each scene and possibly take BTS photos. Make those scene diagrams and brief write-ups of each scene available for a price (the same way that you can buy a published version of a script) online. I feel like this could be an extremely valuable tool for aspiring cinematographers. There have been so many times where I see a beautifully lit scene and wish I knew the lighting schematics. Roger Deakins shares knowledge on his forum but it isn’t very specific. Shane, you share very specific information and lighting diagrams which is fabulous. I’m not saying every movie should have this kind of attention. But for certain films, it would be fantastic. Do you think this kind of request could ever happen / make it through the studio $$$ pipeline of legality? Of course this is based on the assumption that cinematographers (and studios) would be willing to share their ‘secrets’ and lighting setups… Just interested in your thoughts!

19:50:10

Shane and Lydia thank you so much for this incredible resource, your whole team rocks! I have a lighting question that I struggled with and that drove me crazy on a recent production. The director wanted complete darkness, this was a horror film with some paranormal activity taking place, so there was no moonlight and for the most part there were no candles. How would you light for complete or nearly complete darkness but still actually be able to see something of an image? Or is this a crazy thing to try? Thanks, Ryan

24:59:06

Dear Mr Shane First of all I want thank you for sharing knowledge with us . I have a question to you . How do you shoot some movies with different cameras varies in their quality and the audience doesn’t notice that ? Regards Ahmed

31:14:05

Hey Shane, I was curious if you could speak on your process for evaluating a frame whether it’s a camera test/lens test whatever. How do you train yourself to notice subtly nuisances in a frame that help when evaluating things like how the frame rolls off into the highlights, evaluating color/contrast/sharpness when working with different lenses (I find that when I try to do things like that my eye just fails me because more often then don’t it feels like I’m searching for some elusive quality that I can’t even discern.) I want to be able to learn or train myself how to evaluate these subtle details that add up to making a great image.

36:13:10

Hi Shane, I am a weekend warrior filmmaker and have a reasonable grip on the shooting side but am trying to understand the construction of the average 100 minute film. I have dissected a movie, how many scenes, how many shots etc but would appreciate your thoughts on this. e.g is there a loose formula or do you just have a script and shoot what’s required? and let that dictate the length of the movie… Thanks Rod Hardinge, Australia

39:20:05

Hi Shane, thanks for this incredible community and source of information you’ve created. As an actor who is also a filmmaker and has a photography business in NYC, I think I may approach things a little different. I want to ask you about your approach when planning your shots. In your last podcast you mentioned ‘editing in camera’ with the Digital Bolex when you were in school, but when I went to Vincent Laforet’s Directing Motion Tour he recommended getting all the coverage in a more “classic” approach going from a Wide to a Medium, to MCU, CU… He warned about the dangers of not covering your ass. I’ve tried the “classic” approach in the past and on a recent project, but honestly it bores me to death. Personally, I love editing in camera. It’s thrilling to me and It saves me a lot of time in the set and editing room. It also makes me really invest in my coverage and my shots and I love it all coming together in the editing room like I envisioned it on the shoot. Rarely I miss not having shot something and for me, the time savings and my energy in the set make this occasional loss worth it. What is your take on this matter? Do you have a different approach with personal projects vs professional projects? Any Thanks again and I look forward to seeing you again soon. Ricardo Birnbaum.

45:17:03

Hi Shane I am Daniel from Nigeria i do appreciate all you have being doing and still plan to do in the bid to help us the next generation highly appreciate the commitment you put into it. i have a question , what is an emotional breakdown made up of and how do you do that for a script would appreciate if you can share example, insights so i know how to make one in respect to a story. And would like to also know what informs your decisions and choices as you make a breakdown.

49:57:14

Hello my SIC family I just completed MUSE and have developed my keywords that represents what my story says. They are COMPASSION, SELFLESS, UNDERDEVELOPED, LEAD, ENDURANCE. How can these words be portrayed in my Camera emotions, Lens choice, Camera angle, Key to fill lighting ratio, Color pallet, Depth of field. I’d really appreciate all your input and Shane Hurlbut ASC too. Please guys help. Niel Ehimen

Thanks for this incredible community and source of information you’ve created.
Ricardo Birnbaum.

  • Inner Circle
  • podcast
  • techniques

EXPAND YOUR KNOWLEDGE AND NETWORK

With various membership options and benefits to suit your needs and budget, investing in your filmmaking career couldn’t be easier.

Consider signing up for PayPal credit* to receive 6 months special financing on purchases of $99+. For more information, CLICK HERE.
*This offer is not specific to the Hurlbut Academy.

Silver

  • Monthly Membership $14.99 /monthly annual membership Single Payment of $149.88 /annual
  • 28 /credits per month
  • See what you get
  • 20 Bonus Credits on Sign up
  • Choose From 400+ lessons
  • Choose From 700+ hours of video instruction
  • Annual: $.60 per Credit Monthly: $.65 per Credit
  • Membership on Private Hurlbut Academy Facebook Group
  • Invitation to Attend Networking MeetUps
  • Public Facing Member Profile for Networking & Job Searching
  • Worldwide Interactive Community Map for Networking
  • Post your GEAR for Sale or Rental
  • Comments by Shane on Lessons & Courses
  • One phone conference with Shane First 100 people that sign up before March 11, 2019
  • Early Sign-Up & 15% discount on Live (in person) Workshops
  • VIP Status Enables you to see all New Content first before other Members
  • Illumination Experience Workshop & Masterclass Included
  • * If purchased at the regular price of $14.99/month for 12 months

Gold

  • Monthly Membership $29.99 /monthly annual membership Single Payment of $299.88 /annual
  • 65 /credits per month
  • See what you get
  • 20 Bonus Credits on Sign up
  • Choose From 400+ lessons
  • Choose From 700+ hours of video instruction
  • Annual: $.42 per Credit Monthly: $.50 per Credit
  • Membership on Private Hurlbut Academy Facebook Group
  • Invitation to Attend Networking MeetUps
  • Public Facing Member Profile for Networking & Job Searching
  • Worldwide Interactive Community Map for Networking
  • Post your GEAR for Sale or Rental
  • Comments by Shane on Lessons & Courses
  • One phone conference with Shane First 100 people that sign up before March 11, 2019
  • Early Sign-Up & 15% discount on Live (in person) Workshops
  • VIP Status Enables you to see all New Content first before other Members
  • Illumination Experience Workshop & Masterclass Included
  • * If purchased at the regular price of $29.99/month for 12 months

Platinum VIP

  • annual plan only Single Payment of $999.00 /annual
  • UNLIMITED ACCESS
  • See what you get
  • VIP Means You SEE IT FIRST
  • ALL ACCESS TO 400+ lessons
  • ALL ACCESS TO 700+ hours of video instruction
  • NO NEED TO BUY CREDITS: UNLIMITED ACCESS
  • Membership on Private Hurlbut Academy Facebook Group
  • Invitation to Attend Networking MeetUps
  • Public Facing Member Profile for Networking & Job Searching
  • Worldwide Interactive Community Map for Networking
  • Post your GEAR for Sale or Rental
  • Comments by Shane on Lessons & Courses
  • One phone conference with Shane First 100 people that sign up before March 11, 2019
  • Early Sign-Up & 15% discount on Live (in person) Workshops
  • VIP Status Enables you to see all New Content first before other Members
  • Illumination Experience Workshop & Masterclass Included
  • * If purchased at the regular price of $999.00 for 12 months

Do you want pay annually?

Go to pay

Please choose a payment period